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I have a question about my History of Science and Mathematics Stack Exchange post: Source documents for Bronstein's Cube of Physics

When I posted the "reference request" question, I was looking for some document proving Bronstein was the first to introduce the idea of the "chG maps".

Then, on one side, @KCd provided me a link to such a doc, but, on the other side, I found another (recent) article (see link to Sabine's post, added in the modified question) mentioning a different attribution (Gamow, Ivanenko and Landau).

What should I do now?

Should I edit the question again, mentioning the different attribution and asking for help on that too?

Or should I mark the question answered (indeed, the sources are found) and open a separate question for the attribution?

In such a case should I post an answer to my own question, or should I ask @KCd to post an answer so that they get the reputation for that?

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should I mark the question answered (indeed, the sources are found) and open a separate question for the attribution?

In such a case should I post an answer to my own question, or should I ask @KCd to post an answer so that they get the reputation for that?

Since you were looking for sources proving Bronstein was the first to introduce the idea of the "chG maps" and found them with the help from a fellow user your question was essentially answered for you. However, an answer needs be posted so as to help other people who may have the same question; and, thus, I suggest that you self-answer your question. You may also ask the user who helped you (KCd) to answer the question so that you may accept it. However, since in this case, you have already created a draft for the answer go ahead and answer the question (and don't forget to self-accept it!).

Should I edit the question again, mentioning the different attribution and asking for help on that too?

Since you have further questions, you should ask them as separate questions while trying to keep each of them self-contained. In no case, you should alter your original question such that it is drastically different from what you earlier asked.

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    $\begingroup$ Note: I had a discussion with OP in chat to sort out the matter. $\endgroup$ Feb 13, 2022 at 13:37

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